discussion on water relations of plants

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Royal Society , London
Statementby J. L. Monteith and P. E. Weatherley.
SeriesPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. B. Biological Sciences -- Vol. 273; No. 927; p.433-618
ContributionsWeatherley, P. E., Royal Society.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22455098M

Description. Water Relations of Plants attempts to explain the importance of water through a description of the factors that control the plant water balance and how they affect the physiological processes that determine the quantity and quality of growth.

Organized into 13 chapters, this book first discusses the functions and properties of water and the plant cell water relations.

Plant Water Relations: Absorption, Transport and Control Mechan isms from one point with a lower concentration of solutes (for example, pure water) to a point with a higher concentration. So, the higher concentration of the solutes at a point which makes the system more negative will be the osmotic potential in this place.

The water. Water Relations of Plants and Soils, successor to the seminal book by Paul Kramer, covers the entire field of water relations using current concepts and consistent terminology.

Emphasis is on the interdependence of processes, including rate of water absorption, rate of transpiration, resistance to water flow into roots, soil factors affecting water : $   In book: Advances in Selected Plant Physiology Aspects; pathways is still a cause of much discussion, The stomata have a quick and fine control of th e water relations of a plant.

If the treatment of some topics seems inadequate to specialists in certain fields, they are reminded that the book was not written for specialists, but as an Cited by: Plant-Water Relations. Plant water relations involve the absorption of water, ascent of sap, loss of water by transpiration, and the internal water balance of the tree.

From: Physiology of Woody Plants (Third Edition), Related terms: Xylem; Photosynthesis; Arbuscular Mycorrhiza; Transpiration; Stomatal Conductance; Solutes; Water Use Efficiency; Drought. The relationships between plants and water, including the hydration of plant cells and the transport of water within a plant.

Water is the most abundant constituent of all physiologically active plant cells.

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Leaves, for example, have water contents that lie mostly within a range of 55–85% of their fresh weight. Academic Press, - Nature - pages 1 Review Water Relations of Plants and Soils, successor to the seminal book by Paul Kramer, covers the entire field of water relations using 5/5(1).

1. Introductiom Plant–water relations concern how plants control the hydration of their cells, including the collection of water from the soil, its transport within the plant and its loss by evaporation from the leaves.

control of water treatment plants, distribution of treated water, community participation, project management, etc. The purpose of this handbook is to provide comprehensive information specifically on all aspects related to the treatment of water for domestic use. The discussion on water relations of plants book is on the operational aspects of treatment plants.

Publisher Summary. Plant temperature and water use are related because, if a plant is well watered, the stomata are open, transpirational cooling occurs, and canopy temperature is cool. Conversely, as a plant becomes water stressed, stomata close, transpiration is reduced, and canopy temperature increases.

Book description Principles of Soil and Plant Water Relations, 2e describes the principles of water relations within soils, followed by the uptake of water and its subsequent movement throughout an read full description.

Water Deficits and Plant Growth, Volume III: Plant Responses and Control of Water Balance focuses on the influence of water deficits on shrinkage of plant tissues, seed germination, reproductive growth, and internal plant responses such as protoplasmic resistance to desiccation, enzymatic activity, nitrogen metabolism, hormonal relations, and mineral nutrition.

Plants, like all living things, are mostly water. Water is the matrix of life, and its availability determines the distribution and productivity of plants on earth. Vascular plants evolved structures that enable them to transport water long distances with little input of energy, but the hollow tracheary elements are just one of many adaptations that enable plants to cope with a very dry atmosphere.

The following points highlight the five characteristics of soil and water relations of plants. Some of the Characteristics are: 1. Determination of Water Content of Different Types of Soils 2. Determination of Field Capacity (Or Water Holding Capacity) of the Soil 3.

Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.

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Date Issued: Description: This book is written as a companion to the text by Kramer and Boyer () "Water Relations of Plants and Soils" and is intended for students who need to use some of the methods described there.

Water is pervasive in biology, and a student of plants often must face measuring plant water status early in his or her career and virtually alone. Water Relations of Plants attempts to explain the importance of water through a description of the factors that control the plant water balance and how they affect the physiological Book Edition: 1.

Structure of the Water-Conducting Systems in Plants: Xylem and Phloem Sap 9. Water Transport Inside the Plant Stomatal Regulation of Water Evaporation Adaptation to Drought Transport of Water and Organic Compounds in the Phloem Glossary Bibliography Biographical Sketch Summary Water is an essential element for all living things.

In book: Water Stress (pp.1–14) Chapter: 1; Publisher: InTech: Rijeka, Croatia; as a primary effect, alter water uptake and, thus, have a high impact on plant-water relations [13].

Water. Methods of studying plant water relations by Bohdan Slavík,Academia Pub. House of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences edition, in English. Plant-water relations.

Water is the most abundant constituent of all physiologically active plant cells. Leaves, for example, have water contents which lie mostly within a range of 55–85% of their fresh weight.

Other relatively succulent parts of plants contain approximately the same proportion of water, and even such largely nonliving. instrumentation. Chapman and Hall. [commonly called "the pink book"; although a bit dated, provides an excellent overview of the principles behind many field methods and instruments] Slavik, B.

Methods of studying plant water relations. Springer. [good coverage of water relations theory]. Publisher Summary. This chapter discusses the historical aspects of stable isotopes in plant carbon and water relations.

The linkage between 13 C content and photosynthetic pathway type make it possible to determine the extent of C 4 photosynthesis within the plant kingdom. The chapter discusses the basis of 13 C variation in plants.

Applications of leaf 13 C content to ecophysiology have. Plants and any from of living organisms cannot live without water, since water is the most important constituent about 80 to 90% of most plant cell.

Role of water in. As the water flows upward along the wall, strong cohesive forces between water molecules begin to function and pull the water upward.

Description discussion on water relations of plants PDF

This upward pull of water continues until the forces of adhesion and cohesion are balanced by downward force of gravity. However, capillarity alone in the usual sense does not operate in plants. Plant–water relations concern how plants control the hydration of their cells, including the collection of water from the soil, its transport within the plant and its loss by evaporation from the leaves.

(eqns 3 and 4 and the accompanying discussion). They drain quickly because the flow is so much faster in large pores than in small (eqn. Everyone who grows plants, whether a single geranium in a flower pot or hundreds of acres of corn or cotton, is aware of the importance of water for successful growth.

Water supply not only affects the yield of gardens and field crops, but also controls the distribution of plants over the earth's surface, ranging from deserts and grasslands to rain forests, depending on the amount and seasonal. Abstract.

There are many good treatments of water relations of plants, plant cells and plant tissues such as those by Dainty ( a), Slatyer (), Briggs (), Weatherley () and, most recently, the excellent general book by House () covering both plant and animal cells and tissues.

There are also many articles in the old Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology, and there is the. Water potential in a plant cell or tissue can be written as the sum of matrix potential (due to binding of water to cell and cytoplasm) the solute potential (due to concentration of dissolve solutes which by its effect on the entropy components reduces the water potential) and pressure potential (due to hydrostatic pressure, which by its effect on energy components increases the water potential).

Summary. Discussion, along with an animated tutorial of plant water relations, are used to help participants understand water potential components, how water moves through the plant, and how water potential and its components are measured.

Plant ecology is the scientific study of the factors influencing the distribution and abundance of plants. This benchmark text, extremely well received in its first edition, shows how pattern and structure at different levels of plant organization--from ecophysiology through population dynamics to community structure and ecosystem function--are influenced by abiotic factors (eg, climate and.Importance of water for plants Water typically constitutes % of the mass of growing plant tissues and plays a crucial role for plant growth (Taiz et al., ).

Plants require water for a number of physiological processes (e.g. synthesis of carbohydrates) and for associated physical functions (e.g. keeping plants turgid).The quantity of water required for the photosynthetic process, however, is small and amounts to only about % of the total quantity of water used by the plant.

Most functions in which plant water is involved, are of a physical nature. Water is a solvent for many substances such as inorganic salts, sugars and organic anions.